Spring ’18- The Color Story

March 01, 2018  •  Leave a Comment

The photography and fashion world have always been inner mingled. However, as a photographer my focus is on creating images and not always creating outfits. That is why I asked my fashanista friend Tammy Golden to share some of her fashion expertise on this springs fashions. This is for woman who want to feel like a model every day and not just on photo shoot day!

Spring ’18- The Color Story

Temperatures are on the rise which means new spring fashions are ready to make their debut.  What’s hot versus what’s not? Every year the Pantone Color Institute announces a Color of the Year, which for 2018 is a “dramatically provocative and thoughtful purple shade” called Ultraviolet.  I just call it pretty <wink> Then twice a year-- spring and fall—the Institute forecasts the seasonal palette of “it” colors that will make their way from the fashion runways into the stores and ultimately our closets.  Fun fact: not only is the Pantone color forecast relevant in the clothing industry, you’ll find color trends mirrored in home goods and cosmetics as well.

2018 Pantone Colors2018 On Trend Colors

What I love about the Spring 18 color palette is its wearibility. Not really brights and not really pastels, these sherbet-like shades are bound to look good on anyone; especially the purple and turquoise hues which have a reputation of being universally flattering. But what if color is not really your thing? *Cue your closet full of black pants and blazers* Or maybe one of the colors REALLY isn’t working with your skin tone. Never fear. Consider a couple of quick work-arounds that will keep you both on-trend and in-line with your personal style:

  1. Incorporate accessories: If Lime Punch is a little too…well…punchy…for you to commit to a piece of clothing, think about bringing this fun pop of color to your wardrobe through accessories, like a great pair of statement earrings, a clutch or fab pair of shoes (bonus points for grabbing a pair of espadrilles because they are having a moment this season).
  2. Distance yourself: Lime Punch CAN look good on every one, it just depends how close to the face it’s worn. Instead of picking a sweater in that shade, opt for a pair of pants (i.e. away from your face). If you want to wear the sweater consider adding a neck scarf or changing-up your lipstick shade. Both those tricks can do a lot to change how a color “reads” next to your skin.  
  3. Ground in neutrals: This season’s color palette includes some “classic” shades of basically navy, gray, tan and white. Pairing the colors back to these basics will help tone them down.

Now let’s talk about how to style these Spring ’18 colors into outfits. Before you grab that pair black pants out of your closet, we’re going to time travel back to high school art class and, using the color wheel, take a refresher course in super basic color theory—promise it won’t be super boring.

Color WheelColor Wheel

The first color wheel had 12 colors and was created in the 1600’s by Sir Isaac Newton, but, as you can see above, those 12 colors can be expanded into infinite shades. What’s the first thing you notice about the color wheel? Hint: NO BLACK.  Yes, contrary to popular belief, it is entirely possible to create an outfit without a black pair of pants in sight. What???



Let’s work the wheel to create some fresh color combinations that will inject newness into your wardrobe and take your style to the next level.

Lesson 1: The three primary colors are red, yellow and blue. By mixing-and-matching pieces in these foundational colors you create a color blocking effect which is very clean, dramatic and modern. When in doubt, mixing these in any combination, you won’t go wrong.


You can also choose to style complementary colors. Start by picking a color on the wheel and trace your finger directly across the circle to the opposite side. That’s your color’s complement. There’s typically a lot of contrast between the two colors and that’s what makes the combination really pop. A classic and bright complementary color combo that you’re probably familiar with is red and green. Christmas has always been so chic, right? Pastels work equally as well, the contrast is just more subdued. Outfits in complementary colors tend to have a playful vibe.


Next are analogous colors. Pick a color on the wheel and then take the color to the right and left of it. There’s your outfit. As opposed to the high contrast of complimentary colors, analogous color schemes tend to feel more- for lack of a better word- coordinated. Think of the painting “Water Lilies” by Claude Monet with all the cool-toned, muddled shades of blue and violet, or in this outfit pick, combining warmer shades of blush, pink and red working together. Outfits in analogous colors have a little more romantic and subdued feel.


Lastly, and truthfully a personal favorite, is monochromatic dressing. Pick one color on the wheel and go for it, head-to-toe one color. Because monochromatic outfits “dip” you in one color, you will look longer and leaner in them (score!). Added side effect, monochromatic outfits typically look effortlessly chic and sophisticated, even in a casual look like the one pictured.  


Still lacking wardrobe inspiration? Instagram is brimming with fashion bloggers of every age and style. Check-out the hashtags #ootd #streetstyle and #spring18 to see how they are styling the latest colors and trends. Pinterest is also a fantastic resource for outfit ideas and creative color combinations.

Have fun styling your Spring ’18 wardrobe—get creative!

Tammy Golden is a Texas-based fashion stylist and pop-up boutique owner. She’s on a mission to help women discover their personal style, inner beauty and spirituality so they can exude confidence through every aspect of their life. Connect with Tammy via Instagram @goodstyleisgolden.

Tammy GoldenCabi Fashion Specialist



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